Where do i get propecia

Where do i get propecia

If you buy your own health insurance – or don’t have health insurance at all – you might have been pleased to hear that the American Rescue Plan (ARP) has increased premium where do i get propecia subsidies for 2021 and made them available to more people.But receiving those premium home tax credits isn’t necessarily automatic. When and how you get them depends on where you live and other factors, including whether you’re already enrolled in a marketplace plan and whether you’re receiving unemployment compensation at any point in 2021.Use our updated subsidy calculator to estimate how much where do i get propecia you can save on your 2021 health insurance premiums.The early bird gets the premium subsidyAlthough the current hair loss treatment/ARP enrollment window extends through August 15 in most states, it’s in your best interest to enroll as soon as possible in order to maximize the number of months you get the extra subsidies.If you’re receiving unemployment compensation at any point in 2021, the American Rescue Plan gives you access to substantial premium subsidies and full cost-sharing reductions. That means you’ll be eligible for a where do i get propecia Silver plan that’s upgraded to better-than-platinum benefits, and you won’t have to pay any monthly premiums. But in most states, where do i get propecia this benefit isn’t yet available. (Note that in some states, you may still have to pay a dollar or two, even for the lowest-cost Silver plans where do i get propecia.

And it’s worth noting that even if you’re eligible for a premium-free Silver plan, you might find that you prefer to upgrade to a Silver plan that has at least a nominal premium in trade for a more extensive provider network.)Regardless, you’ll still want to enroll – or change your plan – as soon as possible so that when subsidies are available, you’ll receive credit for them.Your state’s marketplace affects how and when you receive your subsidiesFor starters, you should be aware that when it comes to how the ARP’s extra subsidies are being handled, there’s one process in the states that use HealthCare.gov, and 15 slightly different approaches in the other states. Thirty-six states use HealthCare.gov as their marketplace, while where do i get propecia Washington, DC and the other 14 states operate their own state-run marketplaces (Covered California, New York State of Health, Your Health Idaho, etc.). How and when will you receive your premium subsidy in a HealthCare.gov state? where do i get propecia. If you’re in a state that uses HealthCare.gov, your additional subsidies will not be automatically added to your account, where do i get propecia even if you already have financial information on file with the marketplace. You’ll need to log back into your where do i get propecia account and follow the instructions to get your subsidy amount updated.

(You can do this directly through HealthCare.gov or through an enhanced direct enrollment entity if you use one – or your broker or agent can help you sort where do i get propecia it out). Once the new subsidy is determined, you can choose to either apply it to your current plan or pick a different plan.If you’re uninsured or enrolled in an off-exchange plan, you can switch to the marketplace anytime between now and August 15. But the sooner you enroll, the sooner you’ll start receiving subsidies.HealthCare.gov rolled out most of the ARP’s new subsidies as of April 1, where do i get propecia but CMS has said it will be July before the enhanced subsidies are available to people who receive unemployment compensation in 2021.It’s important to understand that regardless of the reason for the additional premium subsidy (including unemployment compensation), the subsidy itself is retroactive to January 1, 2021 in every state, as long as you’ve had coverage through the marketplace for the whole year. So even if your enhanced where do i get propecia subsidy due to unemployment compensation doesn’t take effect until August, you’ll be able to claim the rest of it when you file your 2021 tax return. However, the full cost-sharing reductions for people who receive unemployment compensation in 2021 can only be provided in real-time, and won’t take effect until the marketplace can process them, where do i get propecia starting this summer.

How will premium subsidies be treated in states that run where do i get propecia their own marketplaces?. In the District of Columbia and the other 14 states, the deadlines, subsidy availability dates, and even eligibility rules differ from state to state. In most of these states, the current special enrollment window is functioning like an open enrollment period, with people allowed to newly enroll or switch plans – though where do i get propecia there are some exceptions, detailed below. And in contrast to HealthCare.gov, nearly all of the state-run exchanges will be automatically updating subsidy amounts where do i get propecia for current enrollees over the next several weeks, as long as the enrollee has financial information on file with the exchange. Here’s a summary of what each state with a state-run marketplace is doing:CaliforniaResidents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through December 31.Subsidies are currently available for most people, but subsidy eligibility based on unemployment compensation won’t be available until July or August.For current enrollees, subsidies will be where do i get propecia automatically updated in May.ColoradoResidents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through August 15.Subsidies will not be automatically updated, but are currently available for both new and existing enrollees.

The process will be more streamlined by mid-May.Connecticut:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan between May 1 and August 15.Subsidies will be available to most people starting May 1, although subsidy eligibility based on unemployment compensation will be available by July.Subsidies will be automatically updated by July, for current enrollees who don’t manually update their accounts before then.District of Columbia:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan any time through the end of the propecia emergency period.Extra subsidies are currently available to anyone eligible, including people who are eligible due to unemployment compensation in 2021.Subsidies will be automatically updated in May, for current enrollees who don’t manually update their accounts before then.For where do i get propecia people who have been enrolled through the marketplace since January, the full amount of the additional premium subsidy will be spread across the remaining months of 2021 (as opposed to having to wait to claim the subsidy for the first few months of 2021 on their tax returns).Idaho:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through April 30.Updated subsidies are currently available, and have been automatically updated for existing enrollees who had already provided financial information to the exchange.Current enrollees can change plans, but only to another plan offered by the same insurance company (unless they have a qualifying event).Maryland:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through August 15.Updated subsidies are currently available, and will be automatically added to existing accounts as of May, for enrollees who have opted to receive the maximum available subsidy.Current enrollees with bronze or catastrophic plans can upgrade their coverage. Current enrollees with Silver plans can where do i get propecia switch to a more expensive Silver plan.Massachusetts:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through July 23.Updated subsidies are currently available, and will be automatically updated for existing subsidized enrollees as of May. Enrollees who are newly eligible for subsidies will be able to access them in May, for June coverage.As soon as possible, enrollees who have received any unemployment compensation in 2021 will become eligible for ConnectorCare Plan Type 2A, which has no monthly premiums and low out-of-pocket costs.Minnesota:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through July 16.Updated subsidies are currently available, and MNsure will automatically update existing enrollees’ subsidy amounts if they have financial information on file.MNsure has not yet sorted out specific details for the increased subsidies and cost-sharing for people receiving unemployment compensation in 2021. For the time being, they’ve indicated that where do i get propecia enrollees can claim the extra premium subsidy on their 2021 tax return (which is true in all states. Extra premium subsidies can always be claimed on tax returns as long as the person had where do i get propecia coverage in the marketplace).

But they’ve also said that they’re working on a way for enrollees to be able to claim this benefit in realtime (including the cost-sharing reductions, which cannot be claimed on a tax return), and hope to have more information by this summerMNsure’s current enrollment window is only available to people who are uninsured or enrolled in a plan outside the exchange (it’s necessary to transition to the exchange where do i get propecia in order to get premium subsidies). Current MNsure enrollees cannot use this window to switch plans unless where do i get propecia they have a qualifying event. Minnesota and Vermont are currently the only states in the country with this restriction (Vermont plans to allow people to change plans in July).Nevada:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through August 15.Updated subsidies are currently available, and Nevada Health Link will start automatically updating existing enrollees’ subsidy amounts in June.New Jersey:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through December 31.As of May, New Jersey is expanding its state-funded subsidies to include enrollees with household income up to 600% of the poverty level (this was previously capped at 400% of the poverty level)Updated subsidies are currently available. Existing enrollees can where do i get propecia follow these steps to update their account, and new enrollees can follow these steps.The exchange will automatically update subsidy amounts this summer, for existing enrollees who haven’t yet taken action to update their subsidies.New York:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through December 31.Updated subsidies are currently available. This video shows how existing enrollees can update their where do i get propecia subsidy amounts.

New subsidy amounts will automatically be applied to eligible enrollees’ accounts as where do i get propecia of June, if they haven’t taken action by then.Pennsylvania. Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan where do i get propecia through August 15.Updated subsidies are currently available. Pennie will apply them automatically by June, for existing enrollees who haven’t taken action to update their where do i get propecia accounts by then.Rhode Island:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through August 15.HealthSourceRI has already automatically updated subsidy amounts for current enrollees with income up to 400% of the poverty level (ie, people who were already receiving subsidies are now receiving larger subsidies).For people with income above 400% of the poverty level, as well as people who are receiving unemployment compensation in 2021, the new subsidy amounts will be updated in June.Vermont:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through May 14.For now, Vermont’s marketplace is encouraging people who are uninsured or enrolled off-exchange to sign up for coverage through the marketplace as soon as possible.People who are receiving unemployment compensation are encouraged to call Vermont’s marketplace in order to begin the process of receiving additional subsidies.This summer, people will be able to log back into their accounts and update their subsidy amounts.Vermont, like Minnesota, is currently limiting the hair loss treatment/ARP-related enrollment window to people who are uninsured and people who have off-exchange coverage and need to transition to the exchange. A plan change for current on-exchange enrollees requires a qualifying event. But Vermont Health Connect confirmed that they plan to allow existing enrollees to make plan changes in July.Washington:Residents can enroll in an ACA-compliant plan through August 15.The additional where do i get propecia subsidy amounts will be available by early May.

Washington’s marketplace will automatically update existing enrollees’ accounts so that the new premium amounts take effect in June.People who enroll before May will not see the new subsidy amounts when they enroll, but where do i get propecia their subsidies will be updated in May as long as they provide financial information to the marketplace when they enroll.Enrollees who do not currently receive tax credits may want to switch plans once they start receiving tax credits. They can log back into their account after May 15 to pick a different plan, where do i get propecia as long as it’s offered by their current insurance company.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens where do i get propecia of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts..

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In late March of last year, Frank Cutitta online propecia prescription was admitted to a Boston-area hospital with hair loss treatment. He wouldn't walk out again until the Fourth of July, 100 days later."My name is Frank Cutitta, and I am very happy, literally, to be here," Cutitta told HIMSS21 attendees on Thursday online propecia prescription. As the former HIMSS senior director of content analytics and the founder of HIMSS Media Lab, Cutitta, now the founder and CEO of HealthTech Decisions Lab, treated much of his time in the hospital as a longitudinal case study. From his frustration with patient portal updates to his adulation online propecia prescription of the noble shower chair, Cutitta observed which high-tech – and not-so-high-tech – tools he relied on throughout his battle with hair loss treatment.

This past spring, Cutitta said he'd felt a week of symptoms he'd written off as allergies before a friend loaned him a pulse oximeter. Even when his oxygen saturation levels read online propecia prescription at 82%, Cutitta wasn't overly concerned. After all, 82% is more than a passing grade on an academic scale."Well, that's not that far off from a B," he remembered saying. On the contrary, online propecia prescription he was told.

"You're going to BE in the hospital very quickly." By the time his wife finished parking the car, online propecia prescription Cutitta was sent to the intensive care unit. He was given Propofol and spent more than a month unconscious.Even then, he said, technology played a role. In addition to the tools keeping him alive, his family made him playlists – heavy on Luciano Pavarotti and the Beach Boys – and set up an iPad to watch online propecia prescription him. After Cutitta regained consciousness, he still faced a long road to recovery.

What particularly struck him, he online propecia prescription said, was the loneliness. He spent 23 hours a day by himself, with only the occasional, transactional interaction with a masked clinician to break up the isolation.And when Cutitta finally told a doctor how he felt, the provider responded that he, too, was lonely. He was an oncologist who yearned to be able to hold his patients' hands online propecia prescription. "I'm a lonely person being treated by lots of other lonely people," Cutitta realized.

"It's like a online propecia prescription lonely marathon." In addition to the emotional challenges, Cutitta experienced firsthand how health IT can present hiccups and headaches of its own.For instance, he said, "electronic medical records are great – if people read them." Because his record had so much information in it, his nurses didn't initially realize he'd been approved to have ice chips, which he desperately wanted.He also encountered barriers to interoperability in the most visceral way possible, when it came time to remove his feeding tube. Unfortunately, the tube had been inserted at another hospital and his doctor didn't have access to the users' manual – requiring an ambulance ride and an ensuing story about the device's removal through Cutitta's abdomen that left many in the online propecia prescription audience wincing. "To the best of my knowledge, they're still repairing the hole in the ceiling from when I jumped out of my bed," Cutitta laughed. "I just have a slight idea, in a minimal way, of what it's like having a baby." After Cutitta left the hospital, he online propecia prescription took advantage of remote patient monitoring technologies like a palm-sized EKG monitor, video telehealth appointments and Apple Health's pedometer function.

He also praised one of the lowest-tech devices he used. The shower online propecia prescription chair, which allowed him to clean himself without getting fatigued. "Those are the things I learned about how important the nexus of high-tech and low-tech really is," he said. Kat Jercich is senior online propecia prescription editor of Healthcare IT News.Twitter.

@kjercichEmail. Kjercich@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.LAS VEGAS - Under the Biden-Harris administration, the ONC and the CDC are focused on learning major public health lessons from the propecia and moving forward rapidly to turn those lessons into action.That was a major takeaway from a HIMSS21 session this week when National Coordinator for Health IT Micky Tripathi and Dr. Daniel Jernigan, acting deputy director for public health science and surveillance at CDC, took the stage via Zoom for a fireside chat with HIMSS CEO Hal Wolf and HIMSS Senior VP for Government Relations Tom Leary.“The propecia, though tragic and frustrating and still very much with us, has also done us the service of pressure testing our IT infrastructure in ways unimaginable just 18 months ago,” Tripathi said.Unifying a fragmented systemOne lesson learned was that the United States needs a unified public health response system, which it very much does not have now."Our public health system suffers from not really being a system, which is one of the challenges that we have," Tripathi said. €œAnd it's really a loosely cobbled constellation of systems fragmented in a number of different ways."Jurisdictionally, where we have federal, state, county, metropolitan, territorial, tribal levels that, you know, that all of you don't have a single line of authority but are all sort of collaborative partners in a way.

So we have a value chain of stratification where you have primitive integration in many ways between massive political and administrative IT infrastructures and then a parallel public health system infrastructure that doesn't really integrate very well through all of the other structures.”Jernigan added that fragmented funding is one way that the silos cause problems.“So much of public health work is done using federal and state funds. But much of the work happens with local, county and city government. So categorical funding leads to categorical programs, that leads to categorical systems and software."So we have several funding systems for multiple different things. So when hair loss treatment emerged, there was no categorical program for it, and no dedicated staff.

So we need to change how we have been supporting our systems and move to supporting common platforms that are flexible, scalable, capitated programming in the hospital.”Additionally, public health needs to be integrated into the healthcare technology ecosystem.“We spent billions of dollars to lay a foundation, the EHR systems across the country,” Tripathi said. €œWe didn't make corresponding investments in our public health systems to enable us to exploit in the modern age what our systems can offer in terms of information and functionality.”During the propecia, one area where this was especially obvious was around data reporting, Jernigan said.“Reporting is one-way from clinicians and health care systems, and there's little feedback,” he said. €œAnd so we need to connect public health to the healthcare ecosystem in the same way that providers, labs, pharmacies and others are connected.”Reporting was also too much of a burden because of the fragmentation of response agencies.“During hair loss treatment conditions and health care providers had to report to multiple government agencies,” Jernigan said. €œThere needs to be a healthcare system in place that can then send that information on to multiple different state health departments.”Other lessons learnedData-sharing barriers also made it hard for the right people to have all the information they needed."We need to move past those barriers to data sharing,” Jernigan said.

€œWe need to remove barriers to measure health inequities, so we need to address ways to improve collection and analysis of data to make it easier to characterize social determinants of health and address factors.”Finally, the public health system doesn’t have the people power it needs to manage this sort of situation.“We need to build a public health data science workforce,” Tripathi said. €œWe need to have more training and incentives for joining public health, and have competitive pay for the science workers.”A first-tier customerONC and CDC are working together to address some of these issues. Many of them can be addressed by expanding the work that’s already being done on interoperability.One area of focus is lab-test interoperability.“CDC issued two standards for hair loss treatment test results,” Tripathi said. €œAnd if you talk to a large provider organization, they'll tell you they've got hundreds of different ways for hair loss treatment being represented [by] labs.

Why?. Because there's no requirement. And any federal agency can say, 'Here are two lab codes we want to use.' There's no way to enforce that. There's no way to monitor it.”Another priority is to add to the U.S.

Coordinated interoperability standards (USCDI) with an extension specific to public health, as well as to leverage FHIR APIs.“ONC has a lot of authority over EHR standardization, things like that, we have a lot of levers we can pull in conjunction with the CDC, and we're starting to hear some pretty good thoughts on how that might be able to work,” Tripathi said.“Having public health be a first-tier customer of public networks. They're not today. Thinking of all the data, billions and billions of records over care quality, commonwealth, interoperability today. And public health is a second- and third-tier citizen on those networks.”A Biden administration executive order has kicked all of this into action.

Currently, an interagency work group is working on a report due to be delivered early next year to the HHS secretary, Tripathi said. From there, the secretary will decide on next steps..

In late where do i get propecia March of last year, Frank Cutitta was admitted to a Boston-area hospital with hair loss treatment. He wouldn't where do i get propecia walk out again until the Fourth of July, 100 days later."My name is Frank Cutitta, and I am very happy, literally, to be here," Cutitta told HIMSS21 attendees on Thursday. As the former HIMSS senior director of content analytics and the founder of HIMSS Media Lab, Cutitta, now the founder and CEO of HealthTech Decisions Lab, treated much of his time in the hospital as a longitudinal case study.

From his frustration with patient portal updates to his adulation of the noble shower chair, Cutitta observed which high-tech – and not-so-high-tech – tools he relied where do i get propecia on throughout his battle with hair loss treatment. This past spring, Cutitta said he'd felt a week of symptoms he'd written off as allergies before a friend loaned him a pulse oximeter. Even when his oxygen saturation levels read at 82%, Cutitta wasn't overly concerned where do i get propecia.

After all, 82% is more than a passing grade on an academic scale."Well, that's not that far off from a B," he remembered saying. On the contrary, where do i get propecia he was told. "You're going to BE in the hospital very quickly." By the where do i get propecia time his wife finished parking the car, Cutitta was sent to the intensive care unit.

He was given Propofol and spent more than a month unconscious.Even then, he said, technology played a role. In addition to the tools keeping him alive, his family where do i get propecia made him playlists – heavy on Luciano Pavarotti and the Beach Boys – and set up an iPad to watch him. After Cutitta regained consciousness, he still faced a long road to recovery.

What particularly struck him, where do i get propecia he said, was the loneliness. He spent 23 hours a day by himself, with only the occasional, transactional interaction with a masked clinician to break up the isolation.And when Cutitta finally told a doctor how he felt, the provider responded that he, too, was lonely. He was an oncologist who yearned to be able to hold his patients' where do i get propecia hands.

"I'm a lonely person being treated by lots of other lonely people," Cutitta realized. "It's like a lonely marathon." In addition to the emotional challenges, Cutitta experienced firsthand how health IT can present hiccups and headaches of its own.For instance, he said, "electronic medical where do i get propecia records are great – if people read them." Because his record had so much information in it, his nurses didn't initially realize he'd been approved to have ice chips, which he desperately wanted.He also encountered barriers to interoperability in the most visceral way possible, when it came time to remove his feeding tube. Unfortunately, the tube had been inserted at another hospital where do i get propecia and his doctor didn't have access to the users' manual – requiring an ambulance ride and an ensuing story about the device's removal through Cutitta's abdomen that left many in the audience wincing.

"To the best of my knowledge, they're still repairing the hole in the ceiling from when I jumped out of my bed," Cutitta laughed. "I just have a slight idea, in a minimal way, of what it's like having a baby." After Cutitta left the hospital, he took advantage of remote patient monitoring where do i get propecia technologies like a palm-sized EKG monitor, video telehealth appointments and Apple Health's pedometer function. He also praised one of the lowest-tech devices he used.

The shower where do i get propecia chair, which allowed him to clean himself without getting fatigued. "Those are the things I learned about how important the nexus of high-tech and low-tech really is," he said. Kat Jercich is senior editor where do i get propecia of Healthcare IT News.Twitter.

@kjercichEmail. Kjercich@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.LAS VEGAS - Under the Biden-Harris administration, the ONC and the CDC are focused on learning major public health lessons from the propecia and moving forward rapidly to turn those lessons into action.That was a major takeaway from a HIMSS21 session this week when National Coordinator for Health IT Micky Tripathi and Dr. Daniel Jernigan, acting deputy director for public health science and surveillance at CDC, took the stage via Zoom for a fireside chat with HIMSS CEO Hal Wolf and HIMSS Senior VP for Government Relations Tom Leary.“The propecia, though tragic and frustrating and still very much with us, has also done us the service of pressure testing our IT infrastructure in ways unimaginable just 18 months ago,” Tripathi said.Unifying a fragmented systemOne lesson learned was that the United States needs a unified public health response system, which it very much does not have now."Our public health system suffers from not really being a system, which is one of the challenges that we have," Tripathi said.

€œAnd it's really a loosely cobbled constellation of systems fragmented in a number of different ways."Jurisdictionally, where we have federal, state, county, metropolitan, territorial, tribal levels that, you know, that all of you don't have a single line of authority but are all sort of collaborative partners in a way. So we have a value chain of stratification where you have primitive integration in many ways between massive political and administrative IT infrastructures and then a parallel public health system infrastructure that doesn't really integrate very well through all of the other structures.”Jernigan added that fragmented funding is one way that the silos cause problems.“So much of public health work is done using federal and state funds. But much of the work happens with local, county and city government.

So categorical funding leads to categorical programs, that leads to categorical systems and software."So we have several funding systems for multiple different things. So when hair loss treatment emerged, there was no categorical program for it, and no dedicated staff. So we need to change how we have been supporting our systems and move to supporting common platforms that are flexible, scalable, capitated programming in the hospital.”Additionally, public health needs to be integrated into the healthcare technology ecosystem.“We spent billions of dollars to lay a foundation, the EHR systems across the country,” Tripathi said.

€œWe didn't make corresponding investments in our public health systems to enable us to exploit in the modern age what our systems can offer in terms of information and functionality.”During the propecia, one area where this was especially obvious was around data reporting, Jernigan said.“Reporting is one-way from clinicians and health care systems, and there's little feedback,” he said. €œAnd so we need to connect public health to the healthcare ecosystem in the same way that providers, labs, pharmacies and others are connected.”Reporting was also too much of a burden because of the fragmentation of response agencies.“During hair loss treatment conditions and health care providers had to report to multiple government agencies,” Jernigan said. €œThere needs to be a healthcare system in place that can then send that information on to multiple different state health departments.”Other lessons learnedData-sharing barriers also made it hard for the right people to have all the information they needed."We need to move past those barriers to data sharing,” Jernigan said.

€œWe need to remove barriers to measure health inequities, so we need to address ways to improve collection and analysis of data to make it easier to characterize social determinants of health and address factors.”Finally, the public health system doesn’t have the people power it needs to manage this sort of situation.“We need to build a public health data science workforce,” Tripathi said. €œWe need to have more training and incentives for joining public health, and have competitive pay for the science workers.”A first-tier customerONC and CDC are working together to address some of these issues. Many of them can be addressed by expanding the work that’s already being done on interoperability.One area of focus is lab-test interoperability.“CDC issued two standards for hair loss treatment test results,” Tripathi said.

€œAnd if you talk to a large provider organization, they'll tell you they've got hundreds of different ways for hair loss treatment being represented [by] labs. Why?. Because there's no requirement.

And any federal agency can say, 'Here are two lab codes we want to use.' There's no way to enforce that. There's no way to monitor it.”Another priority is to add to the U.S. Coordinated interoperability standards (USCDI) with an extension specific to public health, as well as to leverage FHIR APIs.“ONC has a lot of authority over EHR standardization, things like that, we have a lot of levers we can pull in conjunction with the CDC, and we're starting to hear some pretty good thoughts on how that might be able to work,” Tripathi said.“Having public health be a first-tier customer of public networks.

They're not today. Thinking of all the data, billions and billions of records over care quality, commonwealth, interoperability today. And public health is a second- and third-tier citizen on those networks.”A Biden administration executive order has kicked all of this into action.

Currently, an interagency work group is working on a report due to be delivered early next year to the HHS secretary, Tripathi said. From there, the secretary will decide on next steps..

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For a casual user to use this file, they must be familiar with database structure and capable of setting up their own queries. The "Read me" file contains the data structure required to download the zipped is propecia a controlled substance files.The DPD extract files contain complete product information for all approved (filename_ap.zip), marketed (filename.zip), cancelled (filename_ia.zip) and dormant (filename_dr.zip) products, for human, veterinary, disinfectant and radiopharmaceutical use.For more information on the Data Extract structure consult the Read me file.Notice. Change effective June 1, 2018As is propecia a controlled substance of June 2018, the URLs for each of the DPD Data Extract zipped files have been updated from hc-sc.gc.ca to Canada.ca. The hc-sc.gc.ca URLs will be removed and will no longer be available.Mailing ListIf you would like to is propecia a controlled substance receive communications regarding future changes to the DPD data extracts, please send an email to the following address to sign up for the mailing list.

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The data extract is a series of Antabuse online uk compressed where do i get propecia UTF-8 text files of the database. The uncompressed where do i get propecia size of the files is approximately 65 MB. In order to utilize the data, the file where do i get propecia must be loaded into an existing database or information system. The typical user is most likely a third party claims adjudicator, provincial formulary, insurance company, etc where do i get propecia. For a casual user to use this file, they must be familiar with database structure and capable of setting up their own queries.

The "Read me" file contains the data structure required to download the zipped files.The DPD extract files contain complete product information for all approved (filename_ap.zip), marketed (filename.zip), cancelled (filename_ia.zip) and dormant (filename_dr.zip) products, for human, where do i get propecia veterinary, disinfectant and radiopharmaceutical use.For more information on the Data Extract structure consult the Read me file.Notice. Change effective June 1, where do i get propecia 2018As of June 2018, the URLs for each of the DPD Data Extract zipped files have been updated from hc-sc.gc.ca to Canada.ca. The hc-sc.gc.ca URLs will be removed and will no longer be available.Mailing ListIf you would like to receive communications regarding future changes to the DPD data extracts, please send an email to the following address to sign up where do i get propecia for the mailing list. SIPD-Systems@hc-sc.gc.ca. CopyrightFor information on copyright and who to contact, please visit the Drug Product Database Terms and Conditions..

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Thursday.An EF-0 twister, with winds of 65 to 85 miles per hour, is the where to buy cheap propecia weakest of six types of twisters. (See the scale at the bottom of this page.)The Kent tornado had maximum wind speed of 80 to 85 miles per hour, an estimated path of 75 where to buy cheap propecia yards, and path length of about half a mile.Damage was confined to uprooted and snapped trees.No injuries were reported.The National Weather Service made determinations late Friday night, Aug. 28, on two other twisters from Thursday's storm.

In the Hudson http://www.ec-niedermodern.ac-strasbourg.fr/?p=595 Valley where to buy cheap propecia and New Haven County, Connecticut. The twister in the Hudson Valley happened just after 6:15 p.m where to buy cheap propecia. Thursday in Orange County in Montgomery in the area of Old Nealytown Road, according to the weather service.It was an EF-1 twister with 90 mph winds and a maximum path width of 600 yards and where to buy cheap propecia path length of 2.6 miles near the Wallkill River.

The bulk where to buy cheap propecia of the damage was large snapped and uprooted trees.No injuries were reported.The tornado in New Haven County, also an EF-1 twister, touched down in Bethany near Judd Hill Road just before 4 p.m. Thursday before where to buy cheap propecia moving through Hamden and into North Haven with 110 mph winds.It had a maximum path width of 500 yards and a path length of 11.1 miles.It resulted in structural damage, including significant roof damage to several homes, and snapped hardwood trees.No injuries were reported.Multiple microbursts affected East Haven, Branford, North Branford, Guilford and North Haven in Connecticut.Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into five categories:EF0 - Weak, winds of 65 to 85 mphEF1 - Weak, winds of 86 to 110 mphEF2 - Strong, winds of 111 to 135 mphEF3 - Strong, winds of 136 to 165 mphEF4 - Violent, winds. Of 166 to 200 mphEF5 - Violent, winds of more than 200 mph Click here to sign up for Daily Voice's free daily emails and news alerts..

A new tornado how can i buy propecia touchdown from severe storm activity in the region on where do i get propecia Thursday, Aug. 27 has been where do i get propecia confirmed.The National Weather Service announced on Sunday, Aug. 30 that an Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF) 0 twister touched down in Kent, Connecticut, near the Dutchess where do i get propecia County border in Litchfield County, at 3:31 p.m. Thursday.An EF-0 twister, with winds of 65 to 85 miles per hour, is where do i get propecia the weakest of six types of twisters.

(See the scale at the bottom of this page.)The Kent tornado had maximum wind speed where do i get propecia of 80 to 85 miles per hour, an estimated path of 75 yards, and path length of about half a mile.Damage was confined to uprooted and snapped trees.No injuries were reported.The National Weather Service made determinations late Friday night, Aug. 28, on two other twisters from Thursday's storm. In the can u buy propecia over the counter Hudson Valley and New Haven where do i get propecia County, Connecticut. The twister in the where do i get propecia Hudson Valley happened just after 6:15 p.m.

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Actors on propecia

In October 2019 the icebreaker RV Polarstern sat trapped in thick sea ice atop the central Arctic Ocean—the only landmark in a vast actors on propecia expanse https://cambridge-passport-photos.uk/customer-information/copyright-information/ of nothingness. Another icebreaker, the Akademik Fedorov, approached it slowly, hauling a load of supplies and personnel. Scientists and crew actors on propecia lined the balconies of each ship, gripping the ice-crusted banisters as they peered across the void. They could see the smiling faces of their colleagues just feet away—but they were two time zones apart.

At the North Pole, 24 time zones collide at a single point, rendering them meaningless. It’s simultaneously all actors on propecia of Earth’s time zones and none of them. There are no boundaries of any kind in this abyss, in part because there is no land and no people. The sun rises and sets just once per year, so “time of day” is irrelevant as well.

Yet there rests the Polarstern, deliberately locked in ice for a year to measure all actors on propecia aspects of that ice, the ocean beneath it and the sky above. The ship is filled with 100 people from 20 countries, drifting at the mercy of the ice floe, farther from civilization than the International Space Station. I’ve been supporting communications for the mission remotely from landlocked Colorado, where time is stable. My world is a bewildering contrast to the actors on propecia alien one the ship’s scientists are living and working in—where time functions and feels different than anywhere else on the planet.

No Time Zones Since the expedition began last September, the Polarstern’s time zone has shifted more than a dozen times. When the Akademik Fedorov and Polarstern parked side by side, they were still hours apart. But with no other people within hundreds of miles in all directions and with no cues from the permanently dark sky, the very concept of a actors on propecia time “zone” seemed meaningless. At Earth’s other pole, time zones are quirky but rooted in utility.

In Antarctica there is land and dozens of research stations scattered across thousands of actors on propecia square miles. At most stations, permanent buildings house laboratories, living quarters and social spaces. Each mini civilization has adopted its own time zone that corresponds with the home territory that built each place. At the actors on propecia North Pole, it’s all ocean, visited only rarely by an occasional research vessel or a lonely supply ship that strayed from the Northwest Passage.

Sea captains choose their own time in the central Arctic. They may maintain the time zones of bordering countries—or they may switch based on ship activities. Sitting here in my grounded office, it is baffling to think about a place where a single human actors on propecia can decide to create an entire time zone at any instant. Last fall the Polarstern captain pushed the time zone back one hour every week, for six weeks, to sync up with incoming Russian ships that follow Moscow time.

With each shift, the captain adjusted automatic clocks scattered around the ship. Researchers paused to watch the hands of analog clocks actors on propecia spin eerily backward. And every time the time changed, it jostled the delicate balance of clock-based communication—between instruments deployed on the ice, between researchers onboard, and between them and their families and colleagues on faraway land. No Time If drifting without established time zones isn’t alienating enough for people onboard, add the unsettling reality that there is no time of day either.

What we think of as a single day, flanked actors on propecia by sunrise and sunset, happens just once per year around the North Pole. So I can’t help but wonder. Does a actors on propecia single day up North last for months?. Is a year just a day long?.

The Polarstern was engulfed by darkness in October after a three-week-long sunset—just as the other pole saw the first bits of a three-week sunrise after months of black. Once polar night takes over, there is only actors on propecia relentless darkness. Looking out from the ship's deck, a person sees a horizonless cavity—unless it is dotted by needles of light spouting from the headlamps of a couple of distant human beings at work—an otherworldly scene not unlike being on the moon. Inside the ship is just as bizarre.

How can 100 people function if there is no day, actors on propecia no night, no morning, no evening?. The voice of the German ship captain blasting over an intercom system is the sound of a wake-up call at 8 A.M.—whenever “8 A.M.” happens to be. People file into the mess hall for meals, held at predetermined intervals. Scientists head out to the ice to check on equipment or meet in laboratories at equally rigid periods actors on propecia.

The ship operates like a windup toy, disconnected from the spinning of the planet, which normally dictates time. €œTime” is just an operational ritual, intended to create the illusion of regularity. When scientists’ fingers are warm enough, they actors on propecia may occasionally send a limited satellite text to their bustling worlds far away. Communication with friends and colleagues who are in dozens of time zones involves convoluted time conversions—a reminder that the people on the ship are in suspended animation.

A fleeting text message is only a momentary connection to a distant existence. Weeks and months blur actors on propecia together. There’s no television, no news, no people passing by. Holidays come and go without festive displays in supermarkets or incessant holiday songs on car actors on propecia radios.

The very concept of “December” feels fabricated. Each repetition of the operational rituals between subsequent periods of sleep feels identical, like living the same “day” again and again. The only actors on propecia thing that truly reminds the team that time still ticks forward is data collection. Research instruments dot the frozen landscape around the ship, collecting measurements of the ice, the ocean, the sky—all on Coordinated Universal Time, which is based, ironically, on the position of the sun relative to Earth.

The science, however, progresses undisturbed. Data collection has followed its own time since actors on propecia the Polarstern shoved off last September, liberated from the mental whiplash the humans endure. For the people onboard, monitoring the ever progressing data gives them a sense of the forward arrow of time. Otherwise, that sense can only come with facial hair that grows—and with the smell of fresh bread.

When the actors on propecia odor wafts through the ship, it must be “Sunday.” When scientists leave the Polarstern, they experience true timelessness. Some instruments are set up miles away on the ice, reachable only by helicopter. It’s so dark during the flights that researchers looking out the window can’t tell how far away the ground—or rather the ice floating on the ocean—is. The helicopter drops actors on propecia them on the surface and takes off again, the sound of whirring blades fading into the distance.

Then it’s true silence. All sense of time is irrelevant actors on propecia. Researchers may be huddled together, their headlamps creating a tiny pool of light in the blackness, like astronauts floating in space. Their head is heavily bundled from the cold, so all they hear is the beating of their own heart.

That rhythm becomes the actors on propecia only tangible measure to track the passing of time. A polar bear guard stands watch as the researchers work, trying to scan the horizon for danger. The polar bear, the animal that actually patrols the dark, frozen landscape, has no concept of time either. Maybe the actors on propecia bear feels only the pulse of Earth as it spins.

What Matters May Be Experience My first of only a few calls from Colorado to the ship involved weeks of planning and trying and failing to connect with a satellite dish up there that could be blown over or buried under snow at any moment. When I finally made a connection, I held my breath and listened to a faint ring, then a long, cold pause. The muffled, husky voice of a Russian radio attendant answered, “RV Polarstern, this is Igor.” A few weeks later I worked to organize a San actors on propecia Francisco–based press conference for the expedition. Our goal.

Connect journalists with ship-based researchers by phone in real time. Logistics meant connecting with colleagues in five time zones on land while trying to nail down the “time” of a ship that could drift into another time zone at any instant actors on propecia. It felt like throwing darts blindfolded at a moving target. We pulled it off, and soon after I was on a plane actors on propecia home.

When the wheels hit the tarmac, I grabbed my phone to text my husband that I had landed safely. When I toggled off airplane mode, I saw the time jump from 8 P.M. To 9 actors on propecia P.M. In an instant.

Time is weird everywhere. Maybe time is defined not actors on propecia by numbers or zones or the spinning of Earth—but by what we experience. When I entered my house, I was eagerly greeted by my dogs. I fed them their dinner—their favorite “time” of day.

Right about then, researchers on the ship were eating a bowl of warm oats before hitting the ice—“time” to check those actors on propecia instruments again.By century’s end, tens of millions of U.S. Coastal property owners will face a decision embodied in the popular exhortation, “Move it or lose it.” But there’s an option for people who can’t imagine a home without an ocean view. It’s called “seasteading,” and it could be a 21st-century antidote to the nation’s disappearing shorelines. €œFloating cities” could become climate havens for people whose lives and livelihoods are tethered to the sea or nearby coast, according actors on propecia to the San Francisco-based Seasteading Institute.

In many cases, floating colonies would be populated by people whose homes are rendered uninhabitable by rising seas and storm surges that chew away at the edge of the continent. Residents would live in modern homes built atop modular platforms that rise and fall with the tides. Some communities could be actors on propecia linked to the mainland by bridges and utility lines. Others could exist miles offshore as semiautonomous cities or even independent nations.

€œNearly half the world’s surface is unclaimed by any nation-state, and many actors on propecia coastal nations can legislate seasteads in their territorial waters,” says the Seasteading Institute, which has embraced floating cities with a near-religious fervor. A few would occupy converted cruise ships flying under independent flags. Others would look like condominium complexes built atop ocean freighters or barges. All will provide offshore refuge from traditional seaside communities where climate hazards are becoming a part of actors on propecia daily life.

As an added benefit, floating cities could enjoy a limitless supply of desalinated water, while homes and businesses would be powered by microgrids pulsing with wind and solar energy. Transportation would require little more than two feet or two wheels, and be entirely carbon-free. In deeper water, floating actors on propecia cities could rely on aquaculture, hydroponics and rooftop gardens. Other essentials could be delivered by barge or ship.

It’s a tough sell, often punctuated by eye rolls. €œThe thing I usually hear when I first talk about this is, ‘Oh, you want to build ‘Waterworld,’” said landscape architect and seasteading advocate Greg Delaune, referring to the 1995 postapocalyptic film starring Kevin Costner as a kind of Mad Max of actors on propecia the sea. €œYou know, that’s not really the image we want people to conjure up, but it’s often the first thing that comes to their minds. I get it,” added Delaune, who recently co-founded the Deep Blue Institute, a Louisiana-based organization dedicated to building marine-based resilient communities.

Delaune is convinced that southeast actors on propecia Louisiana—one of the fastest-sinking coastlines in the world—could be a U.S. Prototype for such a community, where floating structures—homes, businesses, parks and marinas—would offer a more stable life than a sinking marsh. When hurricanes and storms threaten, as is increasingly common on the fast-warming Atlantic Ocean and Gulf actors on propecia of Mexico, modular floating cities could be partly disassembled and moved into safe harbor or to calmer waters, proponents say. The details of how that would happen remain sketchy.

But ship-based communities already have the luxury of movement, and back-bay communities would garner some protection from the ocean shore. Futuristic as it sounds, seasteading is not new, and its adaptability to the United States is already being tested actors on propecia through other human-inhabited offshore infrastructure. The Dutch model Oil and gas platforms host hundreds of workers for months at a time. And as energy companies migrate into deeper water, floating platforms are becoming the norm.

For proof, cross the Atlantic actors on propecia Ocean to the Netherlands, a climate-threatened country whose fate is tied to the sea. €œThe Dutch have been doing this for 400 to 500 years. Now they’re selling their ideas around the world,” Delaune said. €œI see no reason why we can’t design and build sustainable, resilient sea-based communities right here, borrowing on some actors on propecia of the same marine-resilient infrastructure that made the United States a leader in these other offshore activities.” Experts say the origins of floating cities also lie in the Netherlands, where Dutch engineers have spent centuries adapting to life at the ocean’s doorstep.

Much of the western half of the country is below sea level, and Amsterdam, with a population of 1.1 million, is nearly 7 feet below the adjoining North Sea. The Dutch way of coastal adaptation, distilled in the phrase “living with water,” has informed urban planning in waterfront cities around the world, notably its use of highly engineered infrastructure like dikes, dams and floodgates. The Army Corps of Engineers incorporated such approaches into the redesigned Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project actors on propecia built after Hurricane Katrina. Lesser known but gaining notoriety are the floating homes developed over the last two decades around Amsterdam, one of the lowest-lying cities in the world.

They include IJburg, a planned residential district east of Amsterdam where more than 120 floating homes will make up “Waterbuurt West,” a floating suburb on an inland bay called the IJ. When fully developed, IJburg will support 18,000 floating homes for 45,000 people actors on propecia. But what of the United States, where cities like Boston, New York, Miami, Houston and New Orleans are equally threatened by storm surges and rising seas?. Experts say it’s a slow process, in part because much of the coastal adaptation actors on propecia conversation has focused on shoreline protection, home elevations and coastal retreat.

€œThe Dutch have this mentality that we can experiment. The U.S. Mentality is we can’t change anything,” said Dale Morris, director of strategic partnerships at the Water Institute of the Gulf, a national nonprofit based in Baton Rouge, La., that provides research and technical support to communities preparing for sea-level actors on propecia rise and other climate change impacts. For eight years after Katrina, Morris worked for the Dutch government as a liaison to Louisiana and other coastal states facing challenges around water management, flood control and climate adaptation.

Morris is an advocate for floating cities in the United States, but he is also a realist. In an interview, actors on propecia he said floating cities are impeded by social, political, economic and cultural barriers. Among them are the long-standing American ideals of abundant land and natural resources, and the notion that people can spread out as cities become denser, dirtier and more expensive. That hasn’t happened.

Today, 95 million actors on propecia Americans, nearly 30% of the U.S. Population, live in coastline counties, according to the Census Bureau, compared with roughly 80 million people in 2000. Coastal cities also experience some of the most disruptive and costly climate change impacts, as evidenced by the frequency of tropical storms like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Harvey, which hit two of the nation’s largest urban areas. Other hazards include peak rain events, or “rainbombs,” that actors on propecia quickly overwhelm urban infrastructure.

And while storm surge flooding from hurricanes is catastrophic and occasional, king tides and sunny-day flooding can occur daily and are equally damaging to low-lying cities, experts say. €œThere are visionaries who are actors on propecia investing in these important ideas, and the technology that allows us to do innovative things is improving all the time,” Morris said. €œBut the economic components of these ideas have to be addressed. There’s an iterative process between vision and reality.” But, Morris noted, “it’s also true that without inspiration or vision, there is no progress.” Big ideas, big failures That’s where advocates have their work cut out for them.

In the United States, much of the enthusiasm for floating cities is channeled through the Seasteading Institute, which was founded by Patri Friedman, actors on propecia an entrepreneur and grandson of the Nobel Memorial Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman, also a libertarian. Friedman and colleague Joe Quirk, the institute’s president, wrote the bible of floating cities, titled “Seasteading. How Floating Nations Will Restore the Environment, Enrich the Poor, Cure the Sick, and Liberate Humanity from Politicians.” In it, they say “seasteaders are radically misunderstood by landlubbers.” Quirk did not make himself available for an interview, but in an email to E&E News, he said, “Not only is seasteading the quickest, cheapest solution to sea-level rise, we will increase the amount of life on the ocean with every seastead we build.” While not a developer, the institute is a portal for information and advocacy materials, including research papers, blogs, podcasts and YouTube videos explaining and extolling the virtues of floating human habitation. Its website actors on propecia also provides a list of “active” seasteading projects.

Quick also co-created Blue Frontiers, a company that worked with French Polynesia in 2017 to establish a semiautonomous floating city off the Pacific island nation. With pilot costs estimated at between $30 million and $50 million, the project gained significant momentum before it was postponed indefinitely by the government for political reasons, according to the firm. Most floating actors on propecia cities are overseas, but the institute’s list includes Delaune’s effort—called the “Louisiana Opportunity Zone Initiative,” or “Blue Tech Delta”—as well as several projects that remain under development or did not materialize. One in California called Ventive SeaTech aims “to build permanent ocean communities for the masses, using modular structures designed to make ocean living safe, comfortable and affordable.” Its primary product, the “floathouse,” is shaped like a capsule with windows.

It’s described as “a finished home, ready to move in, and is intended to be a year-round home for individuals or a family” by Ventive SeaTech. Another long-awaited project, actors on propecia conceived in 2011 by a California firm called Blueseed, would establish a floating city on a cruise ship parked in international waters about 12 miles offshore from San Francisco. Its developers describe it an “entrepreneurial incubator” and “the Googleplex of the sea,” where international tech startups could collaborate on projects near Silicon Valley without obtaining visas to enter the United States. It raised several million dollars in seed money, actors on propecia including from the well-known tech financier Peter Thiel, but it has been mothballed for six years.

Where Blueseed stumbled early, another cruise ship city that was set to sail this month imploded days before leaving dry dock. The MS Satoshi, conceived as a Bitcoin-based technology hub anchored in the Gulf of Panama, was rerouted to a scrap yard in India after its owner, Ocean Builders, could not find an insurer to underwrite the floating city. In a actors on propecia statement, Ocean Builders said it had “hit the roadblock of having no insurance company willing to insure the MS Satoshi upon dropping anchor in the Gulf of Panama. The closest we came was a company toying with us with a million dollar premium for a maximum of $5 million in coverage, nothing close to the coverage we would need to be legally compliant.” The company said it will issue refunds for 100 cabins it auctioned last month for between $50,000 and $100,000 each.

For U.S.-based seasteaders like Delaune, the bridge to a floating city could be years, or even decades, away. But he actors on propecia is not discouraged. Since arriving in New Orleans, he has been canvassing the region for receptive audiences. He has found a few, including at the Tulane University School of Architecture, where a primary research effort is focused on implementing ideas that emerged a decade ago through the city’s water management planning process called the “Dutch Dialogues.” “I have my pitch deck, and I’ve been rolling it out down here over the last few months,” Delaune said.

€œThe big actors on propecia spin is the dying wetlands east of New Orleans, the buffer areas, the barrier islands. People cannot live in these places anymore.” Delaune says the project could take years to materialize. But as Louisiana undergoes a multibillion-dollar restoration of its coastline, floating communities can be a part of the solution. €œThese people don’t want a Silicon Valley or NASA project to drop actors on propecia into their backyards,” he said.

€œBut when your people are leaving and your economy is dying, there is no plan B except to move away.” Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. E&E provides daily coverage of essential energy and environmental news at www.eenews.net.Editor’s Note. This blog was originally posted in December 2008 to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Apollo actors on propecia 8’s historic mission. It has been lightly edited.

On December 21, 1968, Apollo 8 was launched on one of the greatest journeys in the actors on propecia history of human exploration. Imagine if Columbus took only the Santa María, sans landing boats, 3,000 miles across the Atlantic to the island of Hispaniola. Unable to go ashore, he circled it and recorded his observations in logbooks. Returning later with a three-ship actors on propecia flotilla to plant the flag would still be dramatic, but also a tad anticlimactic.

It’s hard to believe Apollo 8’s voyage around the moon had originally been scheduled as a less audacious Earth-orbit mission to test the whole moonship “flotilla”. The monstrous, still problem-prone Saturn 5 booster, along with the recently redesigned, and only once-flown-by-astronauts Apollo command ship, which was fashioned to carry a three-person crew to and from Earth and into moon orbit. For a landing, it was to fly in actors on propecia tandem with a lunar lander that would ferry two astronauts to and from the moon’s surface. In 1968 the command ship was ready but the lander was behind schedule.

Officials feared that if NASA were to wait for it to test the whole system in Earth orbit before heading moonward, then the goal set by Pres. John Kennedy actors on propecia of a landing there by the end of 1969 would be near impossible. Not only was the clock ticking, but also the CIA had informed the agency that it believed the Soviet Union was on the verge of launching cosmonauts on a moon mission. In August 1968 NASA's Apollo Spacecraft Program Office manager, George Low, proposed making Apollo 8 a mission to circumnavigate the moon some 234,000 miles away.

Working out the details in secret, the Apollo team realized they could actors on propecia do it and, while there, go into orbit. Orbiting made the stakes even higher. If a failure of the spacecraft's rocket engine left astronauts actors on propecia Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders stranded, NASA Administrator Jim Webb feared we would have “ruined the moon” for poets, lovers and everyone who would look at the orb and know there were three dead astronauts circling there. And, if the new navigational, communication or reentry components had failed, the crew could have been lost in space or have burned up in Earth's atmosphere on returning home.

Apollo 8 astronauts (left to right). Frank Borman, actors on propecia James A. Lovell Jr. And William A.

Anders arrive on the actors on propecia carrier U.S.S. Yorktown after splashing down to complete the mission. Credit. NASA That year, public enthusiasm for human spaceflight was as high as it ever actors on propecia would be but a failure might have dampened enthusiasm, thereby slowing or even stopping the U.S.

From fulfilling its attempt to fulfill Kennedy's goal. Apollo 8 realized many firsts, including the first time humans had set their eyes on the moon's farside as well as the fastest astronauts (or, for that matter, anybody) had ever traveled—around 25,000 miles per hour—through space and into Earth's atmosphere during reentry. But what stands out for many is that it was also the first time most people back on Earth had seen their world as a actors on propecia sphere floating in the pitch-black void of space. The iconic Apollo 8 “Earthrise” photo taken over the lunar horizon is credited with inspiring global environmental consciousness and the cultural viewpoint of our world as a unique and extremely fragile planet that must be preserved.

What started as a gamble became one of humanity's greatest moments in exploration—and a public relations coup for NASA. Not only that, but people needed a actors on propecia moment like this in a year like 1968—one shattered by antiwar and race protests and riots. The assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy.

As well as war, both hot and cold. Earth, photographed by William A. Anders as Apollo 8 orbited the moon. Credit.

NASA So, there it was, just what the doctor ordered. On Christmas Eve, pajama-clad kids who otherwise would be looking skyward for eight tiny reindeer were glued to their TV sets, along with an estimated half a billion people around the world, gaping at the moon’s stark, cratered surface hurtling by just 69 miles below and listening to awe-inspired astronauts who read “Genesis” and sent yuletide greetings to “all of you on the good Earth”—the same good Earth they had been viewing in black and white as a fuzzy, cloud-veiled, gibbous globe, like they had never seen it before. Small wonder then that when Borman got back, someone had sent him a message. €œThanks for saving 1968.”With that famous song, sleigh rides and snowmen who magically come alive, so much of the cultural imagery associated with Christmas features a glistening carpet of snow.

But as rising global temperatures start to dull winter's bitter edge, will the proverbial White Christmas become just a bit of Yuletide lore?. Although logic would seem to suggest that warming would mean less snow, the impact of climate change on where—and how much—snow falls is more complicated than that. Climate science cannot say whether there will be snow on the ground in Boston or Chicago on Christmas Day 2050, but there are some general trends scientists expect to see—and also some less intuitive ones. One reason the influence of climate change on snow is difficult to untangle is that snow can be a very localized phenomenon.

One town may be socked in, whereas houses just a few miles away get only a dusting. And the chances of a given location having snow on the ground on any particular date, such as December 25, can vary widely from year to year outside of the most northern locations (in the Northern Hemisphere, where most related research has been conducted). Those traits, along with variations in how snow is measured, make compiling snowfall data to look for trends a delicate business. "That's why you look at multiple years, at multiple stations.

Never trust just a couple of measurements," says New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, who studies snow and climate at Rutgers University. On top of those issues, there are more ingredients to consider when understanding precipitation trends than there are for temperature, because wind patterns in the atmosphere come into play. And snow has even more constraints than rain, as it only materializes when temperatures fall below the freezing point. That temperature dependence means that in a warmer future, "you're going to have more cases where temperatures are just above that magic mark," Robinson says, meaning more winter precipitation will fall as rain.

This trend will start in more southerly locations (in the Northern Hemisphere), and at lower elevations, and will gradually progress northward as the planet heats up. In places where winter temperatures do stay below freezing, however, more snow could actually fall because warmer air holds more moisture. There is already some evidence backing both of these expected trends, Robinson says, with regions such as the Upper Midwest recording more snow in recent years and the southern reaches of the U.S. Seeing declines.

That second point about moisture in a warmer atmosphere is behind one of the quirks scientists have uncovered. Although snow will become less common overall, extreme snowfalls will decline at a slower rate than average ones, so that blockbuster snowstorms become a bigger proportion of all snow events. M.I.T. Atmospheric scientist Paul O'Gorman explained this quirk in a 2014 study in Nature, noting that extreme snowfalls happen in a narrower temperature band than snow overall—temperatures need to be cold enough to freeze precipitation, but not so cold that the atmosphere dries out.

So warming temperatures chip away faster at the broader temperature range in which all snow occurs than they do at the range for extreme snowfalls. Warming may also boost—and change the timing of—a particular type of snowfall. Lake-effect snow, which in the U.S. Is mostly commonly associated with the Great Lakes.

Lake-effect snow happens when cold Canadian air pushes down over the lakes when they are still relatively warm and not yet iced over. This cold air causes the lake water to evaporate, which warms the air above the lake surface. That air rises, cooling again as it does so. Any moisture in it can then freeze and fall as snow.

Rising temperatures will keep lakes warmer, providing more moisture when cold winds happen to blow overhead. Those warmer temperatures will also keep the lakes ice-free for longer into the fall, expanding the lake-effect season. Climate models suggest that trend will not last forever, though, as air temperatures could eventually become too warm to support snow. But while it does, it could mean that areas where lake-effect snow is common could see more Christmas snow if conditions are right.

Yet on a broader scale, picking out any seasonal trends in snow extent—the area covered by snow—is more difficult. There is a clear trend toward earlier melt in the spring, which was particularly evident during the recent extremely warm years in the western U.S. "Irrefutably, [snow extent] is declining in the spring," Robinson says. But for fall and winter "there's no clear signal," he adds.

"There's no glaring change … when it comes to Christmas-time snow." The bottom line, he says, is that we will see snowstorms in the future, and some of those will coincide with Christmas. "There's still going to be winter," Robinson says. "I think people can expect change, but if they're looking for the total demise of snow, I think that's premature."Since it was first noticed in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 2014, the spotted lanternfly—a one-inch-long plant hopper that resembles a moth and is native to parts of Southeast Asia—has been wreaking havoc on East Coast lumber, tree fruit and wine industries. It has spread to at least 26 Pennsylvania counties as well as parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.

The invasive, plant-killing insects are known to lay their eggs on almost any surface, including vehicle exteriors. These egg masses “are most concerning because they can go very far, by hitchhiking,” says Maureen Tang, a chemical and biological engineer at Drexel University. Tang is coordinating a project that asks the pubic to help halt the lanternfly’s spread. Anyone who spots an egg mass can submit photos, with which Tang’s team will train a sophisticated algorithm that scanning devices can use to search for the eggs.

(You can contribute photos here.) Adult lanternflies can fly but prefer to hop. They feast on more than 70 plant species and leave behind “honeydew” droppings, which attract wasps and other stinging insects, and which breed a black, sooty mold that can be fatal to vegetation. The mature insects die in the cold, but their egg masses, which can hold between 30 and 50 eggs and look like a grayish putty, withstand winter temperatures and release a new generation in the spring. Lanternfly eggs.

Credit. Getty Images The team currently has about 400 crowdsourced photos for its data set and anticipates thousands by winter’s end, says Drexel mechanical engineer Antonios Kontsos, who is building the image-processing algorithm. Once fully trained, it will let scanning devices detect significant infestations in real time, Kontsos says. The system will first be put to work in high-risk areas such as rail and shipping yards, where storage containers often sit around for long periods of time and it is difficult and dangerous for a human to check underneath them for egg masses, Tang says.

The lanternflies’ favorite tree, Ailanthus—native to areas the bugs came from—tends to grow near railroad tracks. Drones already use computer vision to scan for signs of pests, by flying over crops and treescapes to check for significant areas of damage. But Tang says her team’s type of discrete, close-up egg detection system is new. €œ;We’ve seen a lot of ingenuity come from spotted lanternfly [research], and this is another great example,”.

Says Heather Leach, who studies these insects at Pennsylvania State University and is not involved in the photo initiative. Any methods that improve the ability to detect and reduce spread of the bug, especially in areas where it’s not yet established, offers a better chance at controlling it, Leach says. The team aims to finish the algorithm and start using it to search for eggs before the bugs begin emerging. Egg masses are much easier to contain than jumping nymphs or swarming adults, notes Karen Verderame, Drexel’s curator of entomology.

Researchers will first target top-priority areas using a portable scanning device that can search for egg masses in visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, Kontsos says. He anticipates someday using a version of this device in a “precision-agriculture framework,” installing it on a drone for efficient, large-area scans. €œFrom an environmental perspective, [this multidisciplinary effort is] the way of the future,” Verderame says. €œYou have to take an out-of-the-box perspective.

It really will take a collaboration of the sciences.”.

In October 2019 the icebreaker RV Polarstern sat trapped in thick sea ice atop the where do i get propecia central Arctic Ocean—the only landmark in a vast expanse of nothingness. Another icebreaker, the Akademik Fedorov, approached it slowly, hauling a load of supplies and personnel. Scientists and crew lined the balconies of each ship, gripping the ice-crusted banisters as they where do i get propecia peered across the void. They could see the smiling faces of their colleagues just feet away—but they were two time zones apart. At the North Pole, 24 time zones collide at a single point, rendering them meaningless.

It’s simultaneously all of Earth’s time zones and none where do i get propecia of them. There are no boundaries of any kind in this abyss, in part because there is no land and no people. The sun rises and sets just once per year, so “time of day” is irrelevant as well. Yet there rests the Polarstern, deliberately locked in ice for a year to measure all aspects where do i get propecia of that ice, the ocean beneath it and the sky above. The ship is filled with 100 people from 20 countries, drifting at the mercy of the ice floe, farther from civilization than the International Space Station.

I’ve been supporting communications for the mission remotely from landlocked Colorado, where time is stable. My world is a bewildering contrast to the alien one the ship’s where do i get propecia scientists are living and working in—where time functions and feels different than anywhere else on the planet. No Time Zones Since the expedition began last September, the Polarstern’s time zone has shifted more than a dozen times. When the Akademik Fedorov and Polarstern parked side by side, they were still hours apart. But with no other people within hundreds of miles in all directions and with no cues from the permanently dark sky, the very concept where do i get propecia of a time “zone” seemed meaningless.

At Earth’s other pole, time zones are quirky but rooted in utility. In Antarctica there is land and dozens of research where do i get propecia stations scattered across thousands of square miles. At most stations, permanent buildings house laboratories, living quarters and social spaces. Each mini civilization has adopted its own time zone that corresponds with the home territory that built each place. At the North Pole, it’s all ocean, visited only rarely by where do i get propecia an occasional research vessel or a lonely supply ship that strayed from the Northwest Passage.

Sea captains choose their own time in the central Arctic. They may maintain the time zones of bordering countries—or they may switch based on ship activities. Sitting here in my grounded office, it is baffling to think about a place where a single human can decide to create an entire time zone at any where do i get propecia instant. Last fall the Polarstern captain pushed the time zone back one hour every week, for six weeks, to sync up with incoming Russian ships that follow Moscow time. With each shift, the captain adjusted automatic clocks scattered around the ship.

Researchers paused to watch the hands of where do i get propecia analog clocks spin eerily backward. And every time the time changed, it jostled the delicate balance of clock-based communication—between instruments deployed on the ice, between researchers onboard, and between them and their families and colleagues on faraway land. No Time If drifting without established time zones isn’t alienating enough for people onboard, add the unsettling reality that there is no time of day either. What we think of as where do i get propecia a single day, flanked by sunrise and sunset, happens just once per year around the North Pole. So I can’t help but wonder.

Does a single day up where do i get propecia North last for months?. Is a year just a day long?. The Polarstern was engulfed by darkness in October after a three-week-long sunset—just as the other pole saw the first bits of a three-week sunrise after months of black. Once polar night takes over, there is where do i get propecia only relentless darkness. Looking out from the ship's deck, a person sees a horizonless cavity—unless it is dotted by needles of light spouting from the headlamps of a couple of distant human beings at work—an otherworldly scene not unlike being on the moon.

Inside the ship is just as bizarre. How can where do i get propecia 100 people function if there is no day, no night, no morning, no evening?. The voice of the German ship captain blasting over an intercom system is the sound of a wake-up call at 8 A.M.—whenever “8 A.M.” happens to be. People file into the mess hall for meals, held at predetermined intervals. Scientists head out to the ice to check on equipment or meet in where do i get propecia laboratories at equally rigid periods.

The ship operates like a windup toy, disconnected from the spinning of the planet, which normally dictates time. €œTime” is just an operational ritual, intended to create the illusion of regularity. When scientists’ fingers where do i get propecia are warm enough, they may occasionally send a limited satellite text to their bustling worlds far away. Communication with friends and colleagues who are in dozens of time zones involves convoluted time conversions—a reminder that the people on the ship are in suspended animation. A fleeting text message is only a momentary connection to a distant existence.

Weeks and months blur where do i get propecia together. There’s no television, no news, no people passing by. Holidays come where do i get propecia and go without festive displays in supermarkets or incessant holiday songs on car radios. The very concept of “December” feels fabricated. Each repetition of the operational rituals between subsequent periods of sleep feels identical, like living the same “day” again and again.

The only thing that truly reminds the team that time still ticks forward is data where do i get propecia collection. Research instruments dot the frozen landscape around the ship, collecting measurements of the ice, the ocean, the sky—all on Coordinated Universal Time, which is based, ironically, on the position of the sun relative to Earth. The science, however, progresses undisturbed. Data collection has followed its own time since the Polarstern shoved off last September, liberated from the mental whiplash the humans where do i get propecia endure. For the people onboard, monitoring the ever progressing data gives them a sense of the forward arrow of time.

Otherwise, that sense can only come with facial hair that grows—and with the smell of fresh bread. When the odor wafts through the ship, it must be “Sunday.” When scientists leave the Polarstern, they experience where do i get propecia true timelessness. Some instruments are set up miles away on the ice, reachable only by helicopter. It’s so dark during the flights that researchers looking out the window can’t tell how far away the ground—or rather the ice floating on the ocean—is. The helicopter drops them on the surface and takes off again, the sound of whirring where do i get propecia blades fading into the distance.

Then it’s true silence. All sense of time is where do i get propecia irrelevant. Researchers may be huddled together, their headlamps creating a tiny pool of light in the blackness, like astronauts floating in space. Their head is heavily bundled from the cold, so all they hear is the beating of their own heart. That rhythm where do i get propecia becomes the only tangible measure to track the passing of time.

A polar bear guard stands watch as the researchers work, trying to scan the horizon for danger. The polar bear, the animal that actually patrols the dark, frozen landscape, has no concept of time either. Maybe the bear feels only the pulse where do i get propecia of Earth as it spins. What Matters May Be Experience My first of only a few calls from Colorado to the ship involved weeks of planning and trying and failing to connect with a satellite dish up there that could be blown over or buried under snow at any moment. When I finally made a connection, I held my breath and listened to a faint ring, then a long, cold pause.

The muffled, husky voice of a Russian radio attendant answered, “RV Polarstern, this is Igor.” A few weeks later I worked to organize a San Francisco–based press conference where do i get propecia for the expedition. Our goal. Connect journalists with ship-based researchers by phone in real time. Logistics meant connecting with colleagues in five time zones on land while trying to nail down the “time” of a ship that could drift into another time zone where do i get propecia at any instant. It felt like throwing darts blindfolded at a moving target.

We pulled it off, and soon after I where do i get propecia was on a plane home. When the wheels hit the tarmac, I grabbed my phone to text my husband that I had landed safely. When I toggled off airplane mode, I saw the time jump from 8 P.M. To 9 P.M where do i get propecia. In an instant.

Time is weird everywhere. Maybe time is defined not by where do i get propecia numbers or zones or the spinning of Earth—but by what we experience. When I entered my house, I was eagerly greeted by my dogs. I fed them their dinner—their favorite “time” of day. Right about where do i get propecia then, researchers on the ship were eating a bowl of warm oats before hitting the ice—“time” to check those instruments again.By century’s end, tens of millions of U.S.

Coastal property owners will face a decision embodied in the popular exhortation, “Move it or lose it.” But there’s an option for people who can’t imagine a home without an ocean view. It’s called “seasteading,” and it could be a 21st-century antidote to the nation’s disappearing shorelines. €œFloating cities” could become climate havens for people whose lives and livelihoods are tethered to the sea or nearby coast, according to the San Francisco-based Seasteading where do i get propecia Institute. In many cases, floating colonies would be populated by people whose homes are rendered uninhabitable by rising seas and storm surges that chew away at the edge of the continent. Residents would live in modern homes built atop modular platforms that rise and fall with the tides.

Some communities where do i get propecia could be linked to the mainland by bridges and utility lines. Others could exist miles offshore as semiautonomous cities or even independent nations. €œNearly half the world’s surface is unclaimed by any nation-state, and many coastal nations can where do i get propecia legislate seasteads in their territorial waters,” says the Seasteading Institute, which has embraced floating cities with a near-religious fervor. A few would occupy converted cruise ships flying under independent flags. Others would look like condominium complexes built atop ocean freighters or barges.

All will provide offshore refuge from traditional seaside where do i get propecia communities where climate hazards are becoming a part of daily life. As an added benefit, floating cities could enjoy a limitless supply of desalinated water, while homes and businesses would be powered by microgrids pulsing with wind and solar energy. Transportation would require little more than two feet or two wheels, and be entirely carbon-free. In deeper water, floating cities could where do i get propecia rely on aquaculture, hydroponics and rooftop gardens. Other essentials could be delivered by barge or ship.

It’s a tough sell, often punctuated by eye rolls. €œThe thing I usually hear when I first talk about this is, ‘Oh, you want to build where do i get propecia ‘Waterworld,’” said landscape architect and seasteading advocate Greg Delaune, referring to the 1995 postapocalyptic film starring Kevin Costner as a kind of Mad Max of the sea. €œYou know, that’s not really the image we want people to conjure up, but it’s often the first thing that comes to their minds. I get it,” added Delaune, who recently co-founded the Deep Blue Institute, a Louisiana-based organization dedicated to building marine-based resilient communities. Delaune is convinced that southeast where do i get propecia Louisiana—one of the fastest-sinking coastlines in the world—could be a U.S.

Prototype for such a community, where floating structures—homes, businesses, parks and marinas—would offer a more stable life than a sinking marsh. When hurricanes and storms threaten, as is increasingly common on the fast-warming Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, modular floating cities could be partly disassembled where do i get propecia and moved into safe harbor or to calmer waters, proponents say. The details of how that would happen remain sketchy. But ship-based communities already have the luxury of movement, and back-bay communities would garner some protection from the ocean shore. Futuristic as where do i get propecia it sounds, seasteading is not new, and its adaptability to the United States is already being tested through other human-inhabited offshore infrastructure.

The Dutch model Oil and gas platforms host hundreds of workers for months at a time. And as energy companies migrate into deeper water, floating platforms are becoming the norm. For proof, cross the Atlantic Ocean to the Netherlands, a climate-threatened country whose fate is tied to the sea where do i get propecia. €œThe Dutch have been doing this for 400 to 500 years. Now they’re selling their ideas around the world,” Delaune said.

€œI see no reason why we can’t design and build sustainable, resilient sea-based communities right here, borrowing on some of the same marine-resilient infrastructure that made the United States a leader where do i get propecia in these other offshore activities.” Experts say the origins of floating cities also lie in the Netherlands, where Dutch engineers have spent centuries adapting to life at the ocean’s doorstep. Much of the western half of the country is below sea level, and Amsterdam, with a population of 1.1 million, is nearly 7 feet below the adjoining North Sea. The Dutch way of coastal adaptation, distilled in the phrase “living with water,” has informed urban planning in waterfront cities around the world, notably its use of highly engineered infrastructure like dikes, dams and floodgates. The Army Corps of Engineers incorporated such approaches into the redesigned Southeast where do i get propecia Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project built after Hurricane Katrina. Lesser known but gaining notoriety are the floating homes developed over the last two decades around Amsterdam, one of the lowest-lying cities in the world.

They include IJburg, a planned residential district east of Amsterdam where more than 120 floating homes will make up “Waterbuurt West,” a floating suburb on an inland bay called the IJ. When fully where do i get propecia developed, IJburg will support 18,000 floating homes for 45,000 people. But what of the United States, where cities like Boston, New York, Miami, Houston and New Orleans are equally threatened by storm surges and rising seas?. Experts say it’s a slow process, in part because much of the coastal adaptation where do i get propecia conversation has focused on shoreline protection, home elevations and coastal retreat. €œThe Dutch have this mentality that we can experiment.

The U.S. Mentality is we can’t change anything,” said Dale Morris, director of strategic partnerships at the Water Institute of the Gulf, a national nonprofit based in Baton Rouge, La., that provides research and technical support to communities preparing for sea-level rise and other climate change where do i get propecia impacts. For eight years after Katrina, Morris worked for the Dutch government as a liaison to Louisiana and other coastal states facing challenges around water management, flood control and climate adaptation. Morris is an advocate for floating cities in the United States, but he is also a realist. In an interview, he said floating cities are impeded by social, where do i get propecia political, economic and cultural barriers.

Among them are the long-standing American ideals of abundant land and natural resources, and the notion that people can spread out as cities become denser, dirtier and more expensive. That hasn’t happened. Today, 95 where do i get propecia million Americans, nearly 30% of the U.S. Population, live in coastline counties, according to the Census Bureau, compared with roughly 80 million people in 2000. Coastal cities also experience some of the most disruptive and costly climate change impacts, as evidenced by the frequency of tropical storms like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Harvey, which hit two of the nation’s largest urban areas.

Other hazards include peak rain events, or “rainbombs,” that quickly overwhelm where do i get propecia urban infrastructure. And while storm surge flooding from hurricanes is catastrophic and occasional, king tides and sunny-day flooding can occur daily and are equally damaging to low-lying cities, experts say. €œThere are visionaries who are investing in these important ideas, and the technology that allows us to do innovative things is improving all where do i get propecia the time,” Morris said. €œBut the economic components of these ideas have to be addressed. There’s an iterative process between vision and reality.” But, Morris noted, “it’s also true that without inspiration or vision, there is no progress.” Big ideas, big failures That’s where advocates have their work cut out for them.

In the United States, much of the enthusiasm for where do i get propecia floating cities is channeled through the Seasteading Institute, which was founded by Patri Friedman, an entrepreneur and grandson of the Nobel Memorial Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman, also a libertarian. Friedman and colleague Joe Quirk, the institute’s president, wrote the bible of floating cities, titled “Seasteading. How Floating Nations Will Restore the Environment, Enrich the Poor, Cure the Sick, and Liberate Humanity from Politicians.” In it, they say “seasteaders are radically misunderstood by landlubbers.” Quirk did not make himself available for an interview, but in an email to E&E News, he said, “Not only is seasteading the quickest, cheapest solution to sea-level rise, we will increase the amount of life on the ocean with every seastead we build.” While not a developer, the institute is a portal for information and advocacy materials, including research papers, blogs, podcasts and YouTube videos explaining and extolling the virtues of floating human habitation. Its website also provides a list of “active” where do i get propecia seasteading projects. Quick also co-created Blue Frontiers, a company that worked with French Polynesia in 2017 to establish a semiautonomous floating city off the Pacific island nation.

With pilot costs estimated at between $30 million and $50 million, the project gained significant momentum before it was postponed indefinitely by the government for political reasons, according to the firm. Most floating cities are overseas, but the institute’s list includes Delaune’s effort—called the “Louisiana Opportunity where do i get propecia Zone Initiative,” or “Blue Tech Delta”—as well as several projects that remain under development or did not materialize. One in California called Ventive SeaTech aims “to build permanent ocean communities for the masses, using modular structures designed to make ocean living safe, comfortable and affordable.” Its primary product, the “floathouse,” is shaped like a capsule with windows. It’s described as “a finished home, ready to move in, and is intended to be a year-round home for individuals or a family” by Ventive SeaTech. Another long-awaited project, conceived in 2011 by a California firm called Blueseed, would establish a floating city on a cruise ship parked where do i get propecia in international waters about 12 miles offshore from San Francisco.

Its developers describe it an “entrepreneurial incubator” and “the Googleplex of the sea,” where international tech startups could collaborate on projects near Silicon Valley without obtaining visas to enter the United States. It raised several million dollars in seed money, including where do i get propecia from the well-known tech financier Peter Thiel, but it has been mothballed for six years. Where Blueseed stumbled early, another cruise ship city that was set to sail this month imploded days before leaving dry dock. The MS Satoshi, conceived as a Bitcoin-based technology hub anchored in the Gulf of Panama, was rerouted to a scrap yard in India after its owner, Ocean Builders, could not find an insurer to underwrite the floating city. In a statement, Ocean Builders where do i get propecia said it had “hit the roadblock of having no insurance company willing to insure the MS Satoshi upon dropping anchor in the Gulf of Panama.

The closest we came was a company toying with us with a million dollar premium for a maximum of $5 million in coverage, nothing close to the coverage we would need to be legally compliant.” The company said it will issue refunds for 100 cabins it auctioned last month for between $50,000 and $100,000 each. For U.S.-based seasteaders like Delaune, the bridge to a floating city could be years, or even decades, away. But he is not discouraged where do i get propecia. Since arriving in New Orleans, he has been canvassing the region for receptive audiences. He has found a few, including at the Tulane University School of Architecture, where a primary research effort is focused on implementing ideas that emerged a decade ago through the city’s water management planning process called the “Dutch Dialogues.” “I have my pitch deck, and I’ve been rolling it out down here over the last few months,” Delaune said.

€œThe big spin is the dying wetlands east of New Orleans, the buffer areas, the where do i get propecia barrier islands. People cannot live in these places anymore.” Delaune says the project could take years to materialize. But as Louisiana undergoes a multibillion-dollar restoration of its coastline, floating communities can be a part of the solution. €œThese people don’t want a Silicon Valley or NASA project where do i get propecia to drop into their backyards,” he said. €œBut when your people are leaving and your economy is dying, there is no plan B except to move away.” Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News.

E&E provides daily coverage of essential energy and environmental news at www.eenews.net.Editor’s Note. This blog was originally posted in December 2008 to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Apollo 8’s historic mission where do i get propecia. It has been lightly edited. On December 21, 1968, Apollo 8 was launched on one of the greatest journeys in the history of human exploration where do i get propecia. Imagine if Columbus took only the Santa María, sans landing boats, 3,000 miles across the Atlantic to the island of Hispaniola.

Unable to go ashore, he circled it and recorded his observations in logbooks. Returning later where do i get propecia with a three-ship flotilla to plant the flag would still be dramatic, but also a tad anticlimactic. It’s hard to believe Apollo 8’s voyage around the moon had originally been scheduled as a less audacious Earth-orbit mission to test the whole moonship “flotilla”. The monstrous, still problem-prone Saturn 5 booster, along with the recently redesigned, and only once-flown-by-astronauts Apollo command ship, which was fashioned to carry a three-person crew to and from Earth and into moon orbit. For a landing, it was to fly in tandem with a lunar lander that would ferry two astronauts to and from the moon’s where do i get propecia surface.

In 1968 the command ship was ready but the lander was behind schedule. Officials feared that if NASA were to wait for it to test the whole system in Earth orbit before heading moonward, then the goal set by Pres. John Kennedy where do i get propecia of a landing there by the end of 1969 would be near impossible. Not only was the clock ticking, but also the CIA had informed the agency that it believed the Soviet Union was on the verge of launching cosmonauts on a moon mission. In August 1968 NASA's Apollo Spacecraft Program Office manager, George Low, proposed making Apollo 8 a mission to circumnavigate the moon some 234,000 miles away.

Working out the details in secret, the Apollo team realized they where do i get propecia could do it and, while there, go into orbit. Orbiting made the stakes even higher. If a failure of the spacecraft's rocket engine left astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders stranded, where do i get propecia NASA Administrator Jim Webb feared we would have “ruined the moon” for poets, lovers and everyone who would look at the orb and know there were three dead astronauts circling there. And, if the new navigational, communication or reentry components had failed, the crew could have been lost in space or have burned up in Earth's atmosphere on returning home. Apollo 8 astronauts (left to right).

Frank Borman, James where do i get propecia A. Lovell Jr. And William A. Anders arrive on the carrier U.S.S where do i get propecia. Yorktown after splashing down to complete the mission.

Credit. NASA That year, public enthusiasm for human spaceflight was as high as it ever would be but a failure where do i get propecia might have dampened enthusiasm, thereby slowing or even stopping the U.S. From fulfilling its attempt to fulfill Kennedy's goal. Apollo 8 realized many firsts, including the first time humans had set their eyes on the moon's farside as well as the fastest astronauts (or, for that matter, anybody) had ever traveled—around 25,000 miles per hour—through space and into Earth's atmosphere during reentry. But what stands out for many where do i get propecia is that it was also the first time most people back on Earth had seen their world as a sphere floating in the pitch-black void of space.

The iconic Apollo 8 “Earthrise” photo taken over the lunar horizon is credited with inspiring global environmental consciousness and the cultural viewpoint of our world as a unique and extremely fragile planet that must be preserved. What started as a gamble became one of humanity's greatest moments in exploration—and a public relations coup for NASA. Not only that, but people needed a moment like this in a year like 1968—one shattered by antiwar and race protests where do i get propecia and riots. The assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy.

As well as war, both hot and cold. Earth, photographed by William A. Anders as Apollo 8 orbited the moon. Credit. NASA So, there it was, just what the doctor ordered.

On Christmas Eve, pajama-clad kids who otherwise would be looking skyward for eight tiny reindeer were glued to their TV sets, along with an estimated half a billion people around the world, gaping at the moon’s stark, cratered surface hurtling by just 69 miles below and listening to awe-inspired astronauts who read “Genesis” and sent yuletide greetings to “all of you on the good Earth”—the same good Earth they had been viewing in black and white as a fuzzy, cloud-veiled, gibbous globe, like they had never seen it before. Small wonder then that when Borman got back, someone had sent him a message. €œThanks for saving 1968.”With that famous song, sleigh rides and snowmen who magically come alive, so much of the cultural imagery associated with Christmas features a glistening carpet of snow. But as rising global temperatures start to dull winter's bitter edge, will the proverbial White Christmas become just a bit of Yuletide lore?. Although logic would seem to suggest that warming would mean less snow, the impact of climate change on where—and how much—snow falls is more complicated than that.

Climate science cannot say whether there will be snow on the ground in Boston or Chicago on Christmas Day 2050, but there are some general trends scientists expect to see—and also some less intuitive ones. One reason the influence of climate change on snow is difficult to untangle is that snow can be a very localized phenomenon. One town may be socked in, whereas houses just a few miles away get only a dusting. And the chances of a given location having snow on the ground on any particular date, such as December 25, can vary widely from year to year outside of the most northern locations (in the Northern Hemisphere, where most related research has been conducted). Those traits, along with variations in how snow is measured, make compiling snowfall data to look for trends a delicate business.

"That's why you look at multiple years, at multiple stations. Never trust just a couple of measurements," says New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, who studies snow and climate at Rutgers University. On top of those issues, there are more ingredients to consider when understanding precipitation trends than there are for temperature, because wind patterns in the atmosphere come into play. And snow has even more constraints than rain, as it only materializes when temperatures fall below the freezing point. That temperature dependence means that in a warmer future, "you're going to have more cases where temperatures are just above that magic mark," Robinson says, meaning more winter precipitation will fall as rain.

This trend will start in more southerly locations (in the Northern Hemisphere), and at lower elevations, and will gradually progress northward as the planet heats up. In places where winter temperatures do stay below freezing, however, more snow could actually fall because warmer air holds more moisture. There is already some evidence backing both of these expected trends, Robinson says, with regions such as the Upper Midwest recording more snow in recent years and the southern reaches of the U.S. Seeing declines. That second point about moisture in a warmer atmosphere is behind one of the quirks scientists have uncovered.

Although snow will become less common overall, extreme snowfalls will decline at a slower rate than average ones, so that blockbuster snowstorms become a bigger proportion of all snow events. M.I.T. Atmospheric scientist Paul O'Gorman explained this quirk in a 2014 study in Nature, noting that extreme snowfalls happen in a narrower temperature band than snow overall—temperatures need to be cold enough to freeze precipitation, but not so cold that the atmosphere dries out. So warming temperatures chip away faster at the broader temperature range in which all snow occurs than they do at the range for extreme snowfalls. Warming may also boost—and change the timing of—a particular type of snowfall.

Lake-effect snow, which in the U.S. Is mostly commonly associated with the Great Lakes. Lake-effect snow happens when cold Canadian air pushes down over the lakes when they are still relatively warm and not yet iced over. This cold air causes the lake water to evaporate, which warms the air above the lake surface. That air rises, cooling again as it does so.

Any moisture in it can then freeze and fall as snow. Rising temperatures will keep lakes warmer, providing more moisture when cold winds happen to blow overhead. Those warmer temperatures will also keep the lakes ice-free for longer into the fall, expanding the lake-effect season. Climate models suggest that trend will not last forever, though, as air temperatures could eventually become too warm to support snow. But while it does, it could mean that areas where lake-effect snow is common could see more Christmas snow if conditions are right.

Yet on a broader scale, picking out any seasonal trends in snow extent—the area covered by snow—is more difficult. There is a clear trend toward earlier melt in the spring, which was particularly evident during the recent extremely warm years in the western U.S. "Irrefutably, [snow extent] is declining in the spring," Robinson says. But for fall and winter "there's no clear signal," he adds. "There's no glaring change … when it comes to Christmas-time snow." The bottom line, he says, is that we will see snowstorms in the future, and some of those will coincide with Christmas.

"There's still going to be winter," Robinson says. "I think people can expect change, but if they're looking for the total demise of snow, I think that's premature."Since it was first noticed in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 2014, the spotted lanternfly—a one-inch-long plant hopper that resembles a moth and is native to parts of Southeast Asia—has been wreaking havoc on East Coast lumber, tree fruit and wine industries. It has spread to at least 26 Pennsylvania counties as well as parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. The invasive, plant-killing insects are known to lay their eggs on almost any surface, including vehicle exteriors. These egg masses “are most concerning because they can go very far, by hitchhiking,” says Maureen Tang, a chemical and biological engineer at Drexel University.

Tang is coordinating a project that asks the pubic to help halt the lanternfly’s spread. Anyone who spots an egg mass can submit photos, with which Tang’s team will train a sophisticated algorithm that scanning devices can use to search for the eggs. (You can contribute photos here.) Adult lanternflies can fly but prefer to hop. They feast on more than 70 plant species and leave behind “honeydew” droppings, which attract wasps and other stinging insects, and which breed a black, sooty mold that can be fatal to vegetation. The mature insects die in the cold, but their egg masses, which can hold between 30 and 50 eggs and look like a grayish putty, withstand winter temperatures and release a new generation in the spring.

Lanternfly eggs. Credit. Getty Images The team currently has about 400 crowdsourced photos for its data set and anticipates thousands by winter’s end, says Drexel mechanical engineer Antonios Kontsos, who is building the image-processing algorithm. Once fully trained, it will let scanning devices detect significant infestations in real time, Kontsos says. The system will first be put to work in high-risk areas such as rail and shipping yards, where storage containers often sit around for long periods of time and it is difficult and dangerous for a human to check underneath them for egg masses, Tang says.

The lanternflies’ favorite tree, Ailanthus—native to areas the bugs came from—tends to grow near railroad tracks. Drones already use computer vision to scan for signs of pests, by flying over crops and treescapes to check for significant areas of damage. But Tang says her team’s type of discrete, close-up egg detection system is new. €œ;We’ve seen a lot of ingenuity come from spotted lanternfly [research], and this is another great example,”. Says Heather Leach, who studies these insects at Pennsylvania State University and is not involved in the photo initiative.

Any methods that improve the ability to detect and reduce spread of the bug, especially in areas where it’s not yet established, offers a better chance at controlling it, Leach says. The team aims to finish the algorithm and start using it to search for eggs before the bugs begin emerging. Egg masses are much easier to contain than jumping nymphs or swarming adults, notes Karen Verderame, Drexel’s curator of entomology. Researchers will first target top-priority areas using a portable scanning device that can search for egg masses in visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, Kontsos says. He anticipates someday using a version of this device in a “precision-agriculture framework,” installing it on a drone for efficient, large-area scans.

€œFrom an environmental perspective, [this multidisciplinary effort is] the way of the future,” Verderame says. €œYou have to take an out-of-the-box perspective. It really will take a collaboration of the sciences.”.